Talk show host attends Baltimore Running Festival

Kaye Wise Whitehead is an award-winning radio show host and activist from Baltimore. But on Saturday, Whitehead will trade in his microphone for sneakers. For the first time, Whitehead participates in the “BaltiMORON-A-Thon” of the Baltimore Running Festival. This is where runners do the 5K at 7:30 a.m. and then do the half marathon just over two hours later. That’s a total of 16.2 miles. For an avid marathon runner, that might not seem like a problem, but Whitehead is a self-proclaimed running novice. She only started training about a year ago after her youngest son left for college. going to Mission Fit in Baltimore two days a week and walking a few miles at a time. But as she got stronger, she developed her stamina. Much of his racing journey is documented on Twitter. Now Whitehead can run for hours. “I see myself in a way that I’ve never seen myself before,” Whitehead said. Whitehead said she’s been watching her diet, getting more sleep and working out. She said running is 99% preparation. “So every week putting 13-16 miles on the legs. Not walking, running. Running all over town – down to Harford Road. It’s been a process,” she said. And what about that dreaded gap she’ll have to wait between races? Well, Whitehead said she even trained for it. “So on Saturday when I’m there it won’t be my first time doing a run so I stopped and then did another long run. We’re practicing this to help our legs understand and the psychological and understand there’s a second race coming,” Whitehead said. And that, she says, is a lesson in running and in life. “Running both humbles you and makes you grateful. Humbles you in a way that I know I’ll never be like Flo Jo. I’m never going to break those records. But it makes me grateful because if I don’t not “I’m not having a good race today, there’s always tomorrow. I think it’s a metaphor for life,” Whitehead said.

Kaye Wise Whitehead is an award-winning radio show host and activist from Baltimore. But on Saturday, Whitehead will swap his microphone for sneakers.

For the first time, Whitehead participates in the “BaltiMORON-A-Thon” of the Baltimore Running Festival. This is where runners do the 5K at 7:30 a.m. and then do the half marathon just over two hours later. That’s a total of 16.2 miles.

For an avid marathon runner, that might not seem like a problem, but Whitehead is a self-proclaimed running novice.

She only started training about a year ago after her youngest son left for college.

“When I started with Coach Chauncey, I was probably 35 to 40 pounds heavier. I was wearing sizes that I had never worn before,” Whitehead said.

She started going to Mission Fit in Baltimore two days a week and walking a few miles at a time. But as she got stronger, she developed her stamina.

Much of his racing journey is documented on Twitter. Now Whitehead can run for hours.

“I see myself in a way that I’ve never seen myself before,” Whitehead said.

Whitehead said she’s been watching her diet, getting more sleep and working out. She said running is 99% preparation.

“So every week, putting 13 to 16 miles on the legs. Not walking, running. Running all over town – down to Harford Road. It’s been a process,” she said.

And what about that dreaded gap she’ll have to wait between races? Well, Whitehead said she was even trained for it.

“So on Saturday when I’m there it won’t be my first time doing a run so I stopped and then did another long run. We’re practicing this to help our legs understand and the psychological and understanding that there’s a second race coming up,” Whitehead said.

Whitehead said she tried not to think about how she would feel when she crossed the finish line on Saturday, saying it was less about the end than the process.

And that, she says, is a lesson in running and in life.

“Running both humbles you and makes you grateful. Humbles you in a way that I know I’ll never be like Flo Jo. I’m never going to break those records. But it makes me grateful because if I don’t not “I’m not having a good race today, there’s always tomorrow. I think it’s a metaphor for life,” Whitehead said.

Javier E. Swan